If you are a first time parent, chances are you read everything you can about baby care and child development. First steps, first words, and first everything get an announcement on Facebook, and are rapidly reposted by proud grandparents, aunties, and uncles. But, who do you turn to if you have questions about your child’s development? What happens if they don’t appear to be developing on schedule? While some delays are perfectly normal, and shouldn’t worry any parent, what if a little bit of coaching could make a big difference, if caught early enough?

LAND ACKNOWLEDGMENT:
It’s important that we acknowledge that we are gathering on and that this podcast is being created on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Coast Salish peoples – Kwantlen, Tsawwassen, Katzie (pronounced Kay-tzie), and Semiahmoo.

If you are a first time parent, chances are you read everything you can about baby care and child development. First steps, first words, and first everything get an announcement on Facebook, and are rapidly reposted by proud grandparents, aunties, and uncles.

But, who do you turn to if you have questions about your child’s development? What happens if they don’t appear to be developing on schedule? While some delays are perfectly normal, and shouldn’t worry any parent, what if a little bit of coaching could make a big difference, if caught early enough?

Today’s guest is the Supervisor of the Infant Development Program at what used to be called the Langley Child Development Centre, which is now merged with the Langley Association for Community Living, to become Inclusion Langley. This new blended organization offers developmental support for residents of Langley from infancy through to adulthood, all at no charge to families. The Infant development program focuses on things like cognitive development, motor skills, emotional wellbeing, visual development, speech development, and confidence for children aged birth to three years.

Included in this episode: What is the new organization Inclusion Langley [inclusionlangley.com]; seamless services for families all FREE of charge; why you don’t need a doctor’s referral for these services; what to do if you notice a developmental delay in your child; infant mental health; the campaign ‘talk to me, play with me, carry me”; emotional development in infants and children; the little things you can do on a daily basis; avoiding “distracted parenting”; tips for working from home with children; childcare and working from home; let’s be “present, not perfect”; research on child development and parent’s distraction; mindful parenting; special services for indigenous families in the Fraser Valley; culturally-appropriate resources; Stó:lō or Halq’eméylem language education for young children; if you would like to be a volunteer or a sponsor, how to get in touch.

Additional Resources:

  • Visit Inclusion Langley’s website, currently under revision as of November 2020: inclusionlangley.com
  • Visit Inclusion Langley’s Child Development Facebook page:https://www.facebook.com/InclusionLangleyChildDevelopmentServices, as well as https://www.facebook.com/InclusionLangley
  • Reach out to them  by phone at: (604) 534-8611
  • Reach out by email: reception@inclusionlangley.com

The “emotional cup” or “emotional bucket” graphic: